Roundup for lawns has a bad name, let’s face it. People are getting confused with Roundup aka glyphosate. But this product is a weed killer NOT a grass killer. It kills many weeds, in fact most of the weeds I encounter in my lawn are killed by it.

So it’s now my go to weed killer. It handles crabgrass, dandelions, clover, spurge, and many more common weeds – even yellow nutsedge. Usually when you want to handle that variety you’ll need multiple herbicides.

Check out my RoundUp for Lawns Review:

You can get it in ready to spot spray with a wand, or you can get it in a hose end sprayer form as well. It makes it easy to apply across your lawn if you have a ton of weeds.

What I’ll personally do is use the hose end version to blanket spray the whole lawn, then when the bottle runs out I’ll use the wand version and spot spray every other week. It sounds like a lot but after the blanket spray there are very few weeds left to kill so it’s a quick walk around the lawn.

I’ve found this method works out great, and because Roundup for Lawns seems to kill nearly every weed in my lawn it ends up pretty weed free with minimal effort. Just remember to use a crabgrass preventer as well, this will reduce the amount of weed pressure. Killing weeds doesn’t prevent new ones, it just kills them after the fact. Doing both is the key to a weed free lawn.

Related weeds: Crabgrass, Clover, Spurge, Dandelion, Lambsquarters, Poison ivy

2 Responses to “Roundup For Lawns”

  1. EdAllard

    On a scale of 1 to 10 how do you feel about this Roundup for Lawns now that you have used it?

    Should I use this before or after my pre emergent?

    • Tim Linden

      I think it works great. You can use it anytime the weeds you are trying to kill are actively growing. Usually around here in April I apply pre-emergent but I don’t need to use any weed killers until May/June. If you get the pre-emergent down early enough it should prevent most weeds.

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